Roaring success of Scottish windfarm shows global potential

Roaring success of Scottish windfarm shows global potential

Hywind Scotland is breaking world records for maximum output and now other firms are competing for sites

It took 10 years to develop the first floating windfarm and it seemed to some a dangerous gamble to put it 15 miles off Aberdeen in the stormiest waters of the North Sea. But after three years of being in operation it has broken world records for maximum output.

Its success even outstrips the speed with which Europe’s other offshore windfarms, those standing in shallow water, have gone from being an expensive renewable option to a mainstream power source. Floating windfarms’ worldwide potential is even greater.

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A successful Cop26 is essential for Britain and the world. Here’s how it can happen | Simon Lewis

A successful Cop26 is essential for Britain and the world. Here’s how it can happen | Simon Lewis

Without a clear plan for what he wants to achieve, Boris Johnson risks becoming a bystander at a crucial world summit

In November Boris Johnson will host the most important global meeting ever to take place on UK soil. The outcomes of this UN summit on climate change, known as Cop26, will help shape the fates of billions of people for decades to come. For the UK it is also the first big stress-test of its new role in the world after leaving the EU.

Superficially the chances of success appear high. The US, China, EU, UK and 97 other countries have now stated that by mid-century their overall emissions of carbon dioxide will be zero. The economics are aligned: coal, oil and gas companies are increasingly poor performers, while renewables companies are booming. The escalating costs of climate emergency coupled with the increasingly obvious benefits of an energy transition are rapidly altering the calculus of what is possible.

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Kerbside scheme to cut electronic waste could be launched in UK

Kerbside scheme to cut electronic waste could be launched in UK

Government consulting on scheme that would increase obligation on retailers to take back broken items

The UK government is considering nationwide kerbside collection of used electrical appliances and gadgets to help improve the recycling of electronic waste.

Local councils in some areas already collect broken washing machines and toasters in schemes funded by waste collection fees that all retailers selling electrical goods must pay. The government is consulting on the best way to implement such schemes across the country and how to fund them.

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Pollutionwatch: how smart braking could help cut electric car emissions

Pollutionwatch: how smart braking could help cut electric car emissions

Extra battery weight of electric cars means ways must be found to cut particulate emissions

You would think that battery electric cars, having no exhaust pipes, would emit less air pollution than diesel and petrol vehicles. A controversial study in 2016 said particle pollution from electric cars would be worse. Due to battery weight, electric cars are about 200-300kg heavier than comparable-size cars that burn oil-based fuel. More weight means more particle pollution from the wear of brakes, tyres and roads. This could offset the absence of an exhaust.

New analysis by the University of Birmingham, suggests that regenerative braking, where the electric motor slows the car, should mean electric vehicles are less polluting in urban areas. A study in Los Angeles found that brakes on electric cars are used for about one-eighth of the time of those on oil-fuelled cars. However, the extra weight of electric cars means they are likely to emit more particle pollution on high-speed motorways.

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The Guardian view on electric cars: greener roads are good | Editorial

The Guardian view on electric cars: greener roads are good | Editorial

Technological advances combined with tough emissions targets are bringing the end of petrol and diesel traffic into view

The prospect of a cleaner motor vehicle fleet is drawing closer. In November, the UK government announced that a ban on new petrol and diesel car sales would be brought forward to 2030. Advances in battery technology mean the tipping point at which electric vehicles become cheaper than other types, without subsidies, could come within five years. Fast-charging electric car batteries are on the horizon, with five-minute “fill up” times in sight.

This is good news for the climate, with transport emissions one of the biggest obstacles to meeting reductions targets, nationally and globally. Also welcome for the UK is the announcement by Nissan that in future it will source 62 kilowatt-hour batteries for its popular Leaf model from the factory next door to its Sunderland car plant, instead of importing them from the US.

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Amid 2020’s gloom, there are reasons to be hopeful about the climate in 2021 | John Sauven

Amid 2020’s gloom, there are reasons to be hopeful about the climate in 2021 | John Sauven

The concerted global response to the pandemic could be replicated for the fight against the climate crisis

In a world rife with disputes and divisions, there will be one emotion likely to unite most people at the stroke of midnight on 31 December: sheer relief that 2020 is finally over.

There’s no risk of overstating it: this past year has pushed our world right to the edge. A single virus leaping from animals to humans was enough to kill 1.6 million people, bring major economies to their knees, and cause untold anguish and suffering all over the world.

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Heat pumps: have a cosy home without warming the planet

Heat pumps: have a cosy home without warming the planet

Home owners can get help from government schemes but but do they really cut costs?

When Graham Davidson and his wife, Pauline, retired to a bungalow in Norfolk three years ago they ripped out the old boiler and replaced it with an air source heat pump at a cost of £10,000. But this pricey replacement has turned into a moneyspinner for the Davidsons – and millions of British households are likely to follow suit in what is expected to be a revolution in home heating.

Davidson, 68, who used to work in the car electronics business, says it was financial gain rather than saving the planet that was at the forefront of his decision. But dumping the gas boiler has probably cut his household carbon emissions by more than half.

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BP leads energy companies preparing two major UK carbon capture projects

BP leads energy companies preparing two major UK carbon capture projects

17m tonnes of carbon dioxide to be stored beneath the North Sea every year

After decades spent extracting fossil fuels from the UK’s North Sea, a consortium of oil companies is preparing to pump Britain’s greenhouse gas emissions back beneath the seabed to help meet the government’s climate ambitions.

BP has set out plans to lead an alliance of energy companies in siphoning off the carbon dioxide from factory flues under new plans in which almost half the UK’s industrial emissions will be stored beneath the North Sea from 2026.

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What is carbon capture, usage and storage – and can it trap emissions?

What is carbon capture, usage and storage – and can it trap emissions?

Experts look to technologies that inject factories’ carbon dioxide deep underground

Technology that can keep carbon dioxide emissions from entering the atmosphere and stoking global heating will be essential to tackle the growing climate crisis, experts say. But how does it work, and why will it make a difference in fighting climate breakdown?

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Britain to get first commercial refinery for extracting precious metals from e-waste

Britain to get first commercial refinery for extracting precious metals from e-waste

Cheshire-based facility will be world’s first to use bacteria-based recycling processes

The UK is to get its first commercial refinery for extracting precious metals from electronic waste, which will also be the world’s first to use bacteria rather than cyanide-based processes.

A New Zealand startup, Mint Innovation, plans to open the facility within 12 months in Cheshire, in the north of England, after delays caused by the Covid-19 crisis.

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